RSSTous les articles taggés avec: "Ikhwanweb"

La culture islamique politiques, Démocratie, et droits de l'homme

Daniel E. Prix

Il a été avancé que l'islam facilite l'autoritarisme, contradicts the values of Western societies, and significantly affects important political outcomes in Muslim nations. par conséquent, savants, commentateurs, and government officials frequently point to ‘‘Islamic fundamentalism’’ as the next ideological threat to liberal democracies. Cette vue, cependant, is based primarily on the analysis of texts, Théorie politique islamique, and ad hoc studies of individual countries, qui ne tiennent pas compte d'autres facteurs. It is my contention that the texts and traditions of Islam, comme ceux des autres religions, peut être utilisé pour soutenir une variété de systèmes politiques et de politiques. Country specific and descriptive studies do not help us to find patterns that will help us explain the varying relationships between Islam and politics across the countries of the Muslim world. D'où, une nouvelle approche de l'étude des
un lien entre l'islam et la politique est nécessaire.
je suggère, par une évaluation rigoureuse de la relation entre l'Islam, la démocratie, et les droits de l'homme au niveau transnational, that too much emphasis is being placed on the power of Islam as a political force. I first use comparative case studies, which focus on factors relating to the interplay between Islamic groups and regimes, influences économiques, clivages ethniques, et développement sociétal, to explain the variance in the influence of Islam on politics across eight nations. I argue that much of the power
attributed to Islam as the driving force behind policies and political systems in Muslim nations can be better explained by the previously mentioned factors. I also find, contrary to common belief, that the increasing strength of Islamic political groups has often been associated with modest pluralization of political systems.
I have constructed an index of Islamic political culture, based on the extent to which Islamic law is utilized and whether and, if so, how,Western ideas, institutions, and technologies are implemented, to test the nature of the relationship between Islam and democracy and Islam and human rights. This indicator is used in statistical analysis, which includes a sample of twenty-three predominantly Muslim countries and a control group of twenty-three non-Muslim developing nations. In addition to comparing
Islamic nations to non-Islamic developing nations, statistical analysis allows me to control for the influence of other variables that have been found to affect levels of democracy and the protection of individual rights. The result should be a more realistic and accurate picture of the influence of Islam on politics and policies.

L'islam politique au Moyen-Orient

Êtes-Knudsen

This report provides an introduction to selected aspects of the phenomenon commonly

referred to as “political Islam”. The report gives special emphasis to the Middle East, dans

particular the Levantine countries, and outlines two aspects of the Islamist movement that may

be considered polar opposites: democracy and political violence. In the third section the report

reviews some of the main theories used to explain the Islamic resurgence in the Middle East

(Figure 1). In brief, the report shows that Islam need not be incompatible with democracy and

that there is a tendency to neglect the fact that many Middle Eastern countries have been

engaged in a brutal suppression of Islamist movements, causing them, some argue, to take up

arms against the state, and more rarely, foreign countries. The use of political violence is

widespread in the Middle East, but is neither illogical nor irrational. In many cases even

Islamist groups known for their use of violence have been transformed into peaceful political

parties successfully contesting municipal and national elections. Nonetheless, the Islamist

revival in the Middle East remains in part unexplained despite a number of theories seeking to

account for its growth and popular appeal. In general, most theories hold that Islamism is a

reaction to relative deprivation, especially social inequality and political oppression. Alternative

theories seek the answer to the Islamist revival within the confines of religion itself and the

powerful, evocative potential of religious symbolism.

The conclusion argues in favour of moving beyond the “gloom and doom” approach that

portrays Islamism as an illegitimate political expression and a potential threat to the West (“Old

Islamism”), and of a more nuanced understanding of the current democratisation of the Islamist

movement that is now taking place throughout the Middle East (“New Islamism”). Cette

importance of understanding the ideological roots of the “New Islamism” is foregrounded

along with the need for thorough first-hand knowledge of Islamist movements and their

adherents. As social movements, its is argued that more emphasis needs to be placed on

understanding the ways in which they have been capable of harnessing the aspirations not only

of the poorer sections of society but also of the middle class.

Les Frères musulmans en Egypte

William Thomasson

L'islam est une religion de violence? Is the widely applied stereotype that all Muslims are violently opposed to “infidel” Western cultures accurate? Today’s world is confronted with two opposing faces of Islam; l'un étant un règlement pacifique, adaptative, modernisé l'islam, and the other strictly fundamentalist and against all things un-Islamic or that may corrupt Islamic culture. Both specimens, mais apparemment opposés, se mêlent et sont reliées entre elles, and are the roots of the confusion over modern Islam’s true identity. Islam’s vastness makes it difficult to analyze, but one can focus on a particular Islamic region and learn much about Islam as a whole. En effet, On peut le faire avec l'Egypte, particularly the relationship between the Fundamentalist society known as the Muslim Brotherhood and the Egyptian government and population. The two opposing faces of Islam are presented in Egypt in a manageable portion, offering a smaller model of the general multi-national struggle of today’s Islam. In an effort to exemplify the role of Islamic Fundamentalists, et leur relation avec la société islamique dans son ensemble dans le débat actuel sur ce qu'est l'islam, cet essai offrira une histoire de la Société des Frères musulmans, une description de la façon dont l'organisation a été, fonctionné, et a été organisée, and a summary of the Brother’s activities and influences on Egyptian culture. Certainly, ce faisant,, on peut acquérir une meilleure compréhension de la façon dont les fondamentalistes islamiques interpréter l'islam


Consultation internationale d'intellectuels musulmans sur l'Islam & Politique

Stimson Center & Institut d'études politiques

Cette discussion de deux jours a réuni des experts et des universitaires en provenance du Bangladesh, Egypte, Inde,Indonésie, Kenya, Malaisie, Pakistan, the Philippines, Sudan and Sri Lanka representing academia,non-governmental organizations and think tanks. Among the participants were a number of former government officials and one sitting legislator. The participants were also chosen to comprise abroad spectrum of ideologies, including the religious and the secular, cultural, political andeconomic conservatives, liberals and radicals.The following themes characterized the discussion:1. Western and US (Mis)Understanding There is a fundamental failure by the West to understand the rich variety of intellectual currents andcross-currents in the Muslim world and in Islamic thought. What is underway in the Muslim worldis not a simple opposition to the West based on grievance (though grievances there also are), but are newal of thought and culture and an aspiration to seek development and to modernize withoutlosing their identity. This takes diverse forms, and cannot be understood in simple terms. There is particular resentment towards Western attempts to define the parameters of legitimate Islamicdiscourse. There is a sense that Islam suffers from gross over generalization, from its champions asmuch as from its detractors. It is strongly urged that in order to understand the nature of the Muslim renaissance, the West should study all intellectual elements within Muslim societies, and not only professedly Islamic discourse.US policy in the aftermath of 9/11 has had several effects. It has led to a hardening andradicalization on both sides of the Western-Muslim encounter. It has led to mutual broad brush(mis)characterization of the other and its intentions. It has contributed to a sense of pan-Islamicsolidarity unprecedented since the end of the Khilafat after World War I. It has also produced adegeneration of US policy, and a diminution of US power, influence and credibility. Finally, theUS’ dualistic opposition of terror and its national interests has made the former an appealing instrument for those intent on resistance to the West.

Les Frères musulmans dans la poursuite de l'existence légale et le développement intellectuel en Egypte

Manar Hassan |


A la suite du tremblement de terre dévastateur qui a secoué la capitale encombrée de l'Egypte et ses villes voisines en octobre 1992, les organisations bénévoles privées – dominées par les islamistes – ont réussi à diriger considérablement les efforts de secours en quelques heures, laissant le régime en place affligé de ses inefficacités bureaucratiques. Les propres limites du gouvernement à fournir le type de services opérationnels cruciaux en période de chaos ne sont qu'un simple exemple de sa crédibilité déclinante auprès des masses.. En outre, sa réponse à cet embarras public a été encore plus austère - en adoptant un décret interdisant tout effort de secours direct par les PVO, forçant ainsi toute l'aide à se matérialiser uniquement par le gouvernement. Mais avec des obstacles gouvernementaux toujours imminents, le régime a lutté pour répondre aux besoins des victimes dans le temps qui a conduit à des émeutes et a posé comme un simple rappel de l'exaspération incessante à laquelle les Égyptiens ont été confrontés dans leur histoire récente. D'où, il est devenu évident que les tentatives de Moubarak pour sauver son image afin de corroborer son emprise sur le pouvoir avaient largement aliéné les forces vitales au sein de la société civile égyptienne. La société civile a, donc, a été une source cruciale à travers laquelle les opposants - principalement les Frères musulmans - tirent le pouvoir d'appel populaire. Être l'une des organisations d'opposition les plus importantes et les plus influentes, les Frères musulmans transcendent les structures sociales étrangères telles que la classe ouvrière moderne, les pauvres des villes, le jeune, et la nouvelle classe moyenne, qui forment une base de support. Certains des membres les plus éminents de la Fraternité appartiennent eux-mêmes à la nouvelle classe moyenne et se mettent donc en réseau à travers al-niqabatal-mihaniyyah (Associations professionnelles). Un exemple est le Dr. Ahmad el Malt, qui était l'ancien guide suprême adjoint de la confrérie et également président du syndicat des médecins avant sa mort

Brothers in Arms?

Joshua Stacher
Within and between western governments, a heated policy debate is raging over the question of whether or not to engage with the world’s oldest and most influential political Islamist group: Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood. In 2006, publication of a series of leaked memos in the New Statesman magazine revealed that political analysts within the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office recommended an enhancement of informal contacts with members of the Brotherhood.
The authors of these documents argued that the UK government should be seeking to influence this group, given the extent of its grassroots support in Egypt. The British analysts further suggested that engagement could provide a valuable opportunity for challenging the Brotherhood’s perceptions of the West, including the UK, and for detailed questioning of their prescriptions for solving the challenges facing Egypt and the wider region.
The Bush administration in the United States has been far less open to the idea of direct engagement with the Muslim Brotherhood, arguing that it would be inappropriate to enter into formal ties with a group that is not legally recognised by the Egyptian government. Cependant, there are indications that the US position may be starting to shift. In 2007, it emerged that the State Department had approved a policy that would enable US diplomats to meet and coordinate with elected Brotherhood leaders in Egypt, Irak, Syria and other Arab states.

Within and between western governments, a heated policy debate is raging over the question of whether or not to engage with the world’s oldest and most influential political Islamist group: Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood. In 2006, publication of a series of leaked memos in the New Statesman magazine revealed that political analysts within the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office recommended an enhancement of informal contacts with members of the Brotherhood.

The authors of these documents argued that the UK government should be seeking to influence this group, given the extent of its grassroots support in Egypt. The British analysts further suggested that engagement could provide a valuable opportunity for challenging the Brotherhood’s perceptions of the West, including the UK, and for detailed questioning of their prescriptions for solving the challenges facing Egypt and the wider region.

The Bush administration in the United States has been far less open to the idea of direct engagement with the Muslim Brotherhood, arguing that it would be inappropriate to enter into formal ties with a group that is not legally recognised by the Egyptian government. Cependant, there are indications that the US position may be starting to shift. In 2007, it emerged that the State Department had approved a policy that would enable US diplomats to meet and coordinate with elected Brotherhood leaders in Egypt, Irak, Syria and other Arab states.

Mahmoud Ezzat dans une interview complète avec Ahmed Mansur d'Al Jazeera

Mahmoud Ezzat

Dr. Mahmoud Ezzat, Secrétaire général des Frères musulmans, dans une interview complète avec Ahmed Mansour d'Al Jazeera, a constaté que les élections à la présidence des Frères musulmans, qui doivent être organisées dans la période à venir par les membres du Bureau d'orientation, sont ouvertes à tous ceux qui souhaitent soumettre leur candidature en tant que candidat.

Dans sa déclaration au talk-show Bila Hedood (Sans frontières) à la télévision Al-Jazeera, Ezzat a expliqué que les documents de candidature ne devraient généralement pas être utilisés pour les candidats des Frères musulmans, mais plutôt qu'une liste complète de l'ensemble du Conseil de la Choura, composé de 100 membres, est présentée pour élire le président et le Bureau d'orientation des Frères.. Il a nié que le Guide général de la Fraternité pour la direction du Conseil général de la Choura ne lui donne pas la liberté de travailler seul pour prendre sa décision finale.. Il a également révélé que le Conseil a le pouvoir de tenir le Président responsable de tout manquement et, si besoin est, de le révoquer à tout moment..

Il a souligné que le mouvement est prêt à faire le sacrifice ultime afin de pratiquer le principe de la Shura (consultation) dans les rangs de, soulignant que le Conseil de la choura élira le président et un nouveau bureau d'orientation au cours de l'année à venir.

Il a commenté la couverture médiatique de ce qui s'est réellement passé dans les coulisses du Bureau d'orientation, citant que le comité composé de personnalités telles que le Dr. Essam el-Erian et un certain nombre de membres du Bureau d'orientation chargés d'imprimer le communiqué hebdomadaire du Président se sont opposés à M.. Le souhait de Mahdi Akef d'une légère divergence d'opinion. Le premier mandat d'Akef se terminera en janvier 13, 2010 cependant il a annoncé plus tôt; il décidera toujours s'il restera en fonction pour un second mandat en tant que guide général du groupe.

Il a ajouté qu'Akef, 81 ans, avait informé plus tôt les membres du Bureau d'orientation qu'il avait l'intention de démissionner et qu'il ne servirait pas pour un deuxième mandat.. Les membres du Bureau ont immédiatement répondu en l'exhortant à rester en fonction.

Dans son message hebdomadaire, Mahdi Akef a vaguement évoqué ses intentions de ne pas briguer un second mandat et a remercié les Frères musulmans et les membres du Bureau d'orientation qui ont partagé avec lui la responsabilité comme s'il voulait que ce soit son discours d'adieu.. Le dimanche, octobre 17 les médias ont affirmé que le président de la confrérie avait annoncé sa démission; Cependant, le président a nié à plusieurs reprises les allégations des médias selon lesquelles il est venu au bureau le lendemain et a rencontré des membres. Il a ensuite publié une déclaration révélant la vérité. Allégations des médias sur le refus du Guidance Bureau de nommer le Dr. Essam el-Erian sont totalement faux.

Dr. Mahmoud Ezzat a assuré que le mouvement est heureux de donner l'occasion aux membres de partager leurs opinions, souligner qu'il s'agit d'une manifestation de puissance correspondant à sa grande taille et à son rôle de premier plan, indiquant que le président des Frères musulmans est très heureux de le faire.

Il a souligné que toutes les questions reviennent au Bureau d'orientation pour la décision finale où ses résolutions sont contraignantes et satisfaisantes pour tous, quelles que soient les divergences d'opinion.

“Je ne sous-estime pas ce qui s'est déjà passé ou je dirais simplement qu'il n'y a pas de crise, à la fois, il ne faut pas souffler les choses hors de leur contexte, nous sommes déterminés à appliquer le principe de la Shura”, il ajouta.

Il a été discuté plus tôt lors de la réunion suivante du Bureau d'orientation que le Conseil de la choura du groupe a le droit exclusif d'élire l'adhésion du Bureau d'orientation à tout membre., il expliqua. Dr. Essam lui-même a convenu qu'il n'était pas approprié de nommer un nouveau membre au Bureau d'orientation de la Fraternité puisque l'élection était proche.

Ezzat a déclaré que l'épisode avait été présenté au Conseil de la Choura sur recommandation du bureau d'orientation au milieu des arrestations et détentions fréquentes menées par la sécurité de l'État.. Nous nous efforçons d'impliquer le Conseil de la Choura pour choisir le prochain président et les membres du Bureau d'orientation. On s'attend à ce que toute l'affaire soit résolue, la volonté d'Allah, avant janvier 13.

Il a été décidé lors de cette réunion par le Président et les membres du Bureau d'orientation MB d'envoyer une lettre au Conseil de la Choura, soulignant que la date de ces élections ne sera pas postérieure au sixième mois. On supposait que les débats seraient menés avant ou pendant les élections au cours desquelles 5 de nouveaux membres ont été élus l'année dernière. C'est la décision du Conseil de la Shura et non du MB Guidance Bureau. par conséquent, le Conseil de la Choura du groupe général a finalement pris la décision unanime de tenir des élections dès que possible.

Il a souligné que les Frères musulmans, avec l'application de la Choura est organisé par son règlement intérieur. Règlements adoptés et préconisés par les lois du Conseil de la Choura et susceptibles de changer. L'amendement le plus récent en cours avec l'une de ses clauses est la durée du mandat d'un membre du Bureau d'orientation prévoit qu'un membre ne doit pas servir plus de deux mandats consécutifs.

Certains membres du Bureau d'orientation ont été accusés de leur adhésion à rester en poste pendant de nombreuses années; Dr. Ezzat a affirmé que les arrestations fréquentes qui n'excluaient personne le Bureau Exécutif nous a incités à modifier un autre article du Règlement intérieur qui prévoit qu'un membre conserve son affiliation même s'il est détenu. L'absence des honorables œuvrant pour le bien-être de leur pays et la sublime mission nous ont amenés à insister pour qu'ils maintiennent leur adhésion. L'ingénieur Khayrat Al-Shater restera en tant que deuxième vice-président de la MB et le Dr. Mohammed Ali Bishr membre du Bureau Exécutif du MB. Il est prévu que Bishr soit publié le mois prochain.

Dr. Mahmoud Ezzat a complètement démenti les rumeurs de conflits internes au sein du groupe d'opposition concernant le leadership, soulignant que les mécanismes, les réglementations et les conditions ouvrent la voie à la sélection des leaders du mouvement. Il a également noté que la situation géographique de l'Égypte et son poids moral considérable au sein du monde musulman justifient la nécessité pour le président du MB d'être égyptien..

“Le Bureau d'orientation explore actuellement la tendance générale du Conseil de la Choura de 100 membres de la Fraternité en ce qui concerne la nomination d'un candidat approprié éligible pour assumer la présidence.”, il a dit.

“Il est extrêmement difficile de prédire qui sera le prochain président, en notant que 5 minutes avant la nomination de M.. Akef en tant que président, personne ne savait, les bulletins de vote ont seulement décidé qui serait le nouveau chef”, il a dit.

Dr. Mahmoud Ezzat a attribué les rapports apparemment contradictoires des médias sur leurs allégations concernant les remarques concernant les hauts dirigeants de la Fraternité aux mêmes incohérences que les rapports des médias sur les hauts dirigeants qui varient d'un journal à l'autre..

Dr. Mahmoud Ezzat a fait la lumière avec des chiffres sur les raids de sécurité qui ont conduit à l'arrestation de certains 2696 membres du groupe en 2007, 3674 dans 2008 et 5022 dans 2009. Cela a entraîné l'incapacité du Conseil de la Choura de tenir des réunions et de se présenter aux élections.

Il a également souligné que les Frères musulmans sont extrêmement soucieux de maintenir la sécurité nationale de l'Égypte et de ses’ intérêt à réaliser une réforme pacifique dans la société. “Nous sommes bien conscients que les réunions du Bureau d'orientation sont surveillées par la sécurité bien que nous entendions seulement pratiquer la démocratie. En réalité, nous ne voulons pas provoquer l'hostilité et l'animosité des autres”.

Il a également souligné que les différences au sein de l'organisation ne sont pas motivées par la haine ou les différences personnelles puisque les tempéraments décents encouragés par les enseignements sublimes de l'Islam nous encouragent à tolérer la différence d'opinions.. Il a ajouté que l'histoire a prouvé que le mouvement des Frères musulmans a rencontré des circonstances beaucoup plus difficiles que la crise actuelle.

Les médias ont projeté une image négative des Frères musulmans où ils se sont appuyés sur les enquêtes du SSI pour obtenir des informations. Il est impératif que les journalistes obtiennent des faits des sources originales s'ils veulent avoir une sorte de crédibilité. En fait, la justice a invalidé toutes les accusations rapportées dans l'enquête de l'État, il a dit.

Dr. Mahmoud Ezzat était optimiste que la crise politique actuelle passera en affirmant que les événements prouveront que les Frères musulmans avec toutes leurs nobles manières, objectivité, et la pratique de la démocratie brillera avec brio.

Publié le Ikhwanweb

L'Internet et la politique islamiste en Jordanie, Maroc et l'Egypte.

The end of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first saw a
dissemination of the Internet as a center of communication, information, entertainment and
commerce. The spread of the Internet reached all four corners of the globe, connecting the
researcher in Antarctica with the farmer in Guatemala and the newscaster in Moscow to the
Bedouin in Egypt. Through the Internet, the flow of information and real-time news reaches
across continents, and the voices of subalternity have the potential to project their previously
silenced voices through blogs, websites and social networking sites. Political organizations
across the left-right continuum have targeted the Internet as the political mobilizer of the future,
and governments now provide access to historical documents, party platforms, et
administrative papers through their sites. Similarly, religious groups display their beliefs online
through official sites, and forums allow members from across the globe to debate issues of
eschatology, orthopraxy and any number of nuanced theological issues. Fusing the two, Islamist
political organizations have made their presence known through sophisticated websites detailing
their political platforms, relevant news stories, and religiously oriented material discussing their
theological views. This paper will specifically examine this nexus – the use of the Internet by
Islamist political organizations in the Middle East in the countries of Jordan, Morocco and
Egypte.
Although a wide range of Islamist political organizations utilize the Internet as a forum to
publicize their views and create a national or international reputation, the methods and intentions
of these groups vary greatly and depend on the nature of the organization. This paper will
examine the use of the Internet by three ‘moderate’ Islamist parties: the Islamic Action Front in
2
Jordanie, the Justice and Development Party in Morocco and the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt.
As these three parties have increased their political sophistication and reputation, both at home
and abroad, they have increasingly utilized the Internet for a variety of purposes. First, Islamist
organizations have used the Internet as a contemporary extension of the public sphere, a sphere
through which parties frame, communicate and institutionalize ideas to a broader public.
Secondly, the Internet provides Islamist organizations an unfiltered forum through which
officials may promote and advertise their positions and views, as well as circumvent local media
restrictions imposed by the state. Finally, the Internet allows Islamist organizations to present a
counterhegemonic discourse in opposition to the ruling regime or monarchy or on display to an
international audience. This third motivation applies most specifically to the Muslim
Fraternité, which presents a sophisticated English language website designed in a Western
style and tailored to reach a selective audience of scholars, politicians and journalists. The MB
has excelled in this so-called “bridgeblogging” 1 and has set the standard for Islamist parties
attempting to influence international perceptions of their positions and work. The content varies
between the Arabic and English versions of the site, and will be examined further in the section
on the Muslim Brotherhood. These three goals overlap significantly in both their intentions and
desired outcomes; cependant, each goal targets a different actor: the public, the media, et le
régime. Following an analysis of these three areas, this paper will proceed into a case study
analysis of the websites of the IAF, the PJD and the Muslim Brotherhood.
1

Andrew Helms

Ikhwanweb

The end of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first saw a dissemination of the Internet as a center of communication, information, entertainment and commerce.

The spread of the Internet reached all four corners of the globe, connecting the researcher in Antarctica with the farmer in Guatemala and the newscaster in Moscow to the Bedouin in Egypt.

Through the Internet, the flow of information and real-time news reaches across continents, and the voices of subalternity have the potential to project their previously silenced voices through blogs, websites and social networking sites.

Political organizations across the left-right continuum have targeted the Internet as the political mobilizer of the future, and governments now provide access to historical documents, party platforms, and administrative papers through their sites. Similarly, religious groups display their beliefs online through official sites, and forums allow members from across the globe to debate issues of eschatology, orthopraxy and any number of nuanced theological issues.

Fusing the two, Islamist political organizations have made their presence known through sophisticated websites detailing their political platforms, relevant news stories, and religiously oriented material discussing their theological views. This paper will specifically examine this nexus – the use of the Internet by Islamist political organizations in the Middle East in the countries of Jordan, Maroc et l'Egypte.

Although a wide range of Islamist political organizations utilize the Internet as a forum to publicize their views and create a national or international reputation, the methods and intentions of these groups vary greatly and depend on the nature of the organization.

This paper will examine the use of the Internet by three ‘moderate’ Islamist parties: the Islamic Action Front in Jordan, the Justice and Development Party in Morocco and the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt. As these three parties have increased their political sophistication and reputation, both at home and abroad, they have increasingly utilized the Internet for a variety of purposes.

First, Islamist organizations have used the Internet as a contemporary extension of the public sphere, a sphere through which parties frame, communicate and institutionalize ideas to a broader public.

Secondly, the Internet provides Islamist organizations an unfiltered forum through which officials may promote and advertise their positions and views, as well as circumvent local media restrictions imposed by the state.

Finally, the Internet allows Islamist organizations to present a counterhegemonic discourse in opposition to the ruling regime or monarchy or on display to an international audience. This third motivation applies most specifically to the Muslim Brotherhood, which presents a sophisticated English language website designed in a Western style and tailored to reach a selective audience of scholars, politicians and journalists.

The MB has excelled in this so-called “bridgeblogging” 1 and has set the standard for Islamist parties attempting to influence international perceptions of their positions and work. The content varies between the Arabic and English versions of the site, and will be examined further in the section on the Muslim Brotherhood.

These three goals overlap significantly in both their intentions and desired outcomes; cependant, each goal targets a different actor: the public, the media, and the regime. Following an analysis of these three areas, this paper will proceed into a case study analysis of the websites of the IAF, the PJD and the Muslim Brotherhood.